6 XII 1919, Přerov (Moravia) — 27 I 1945, KL Fürstengrube

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Biography

Gideon Klein was a pianist, composer, and educator. He received a scholarship from the Royal Academy of Music in London, but anti-Jewish regulations prevented him from making the trip. He organised the cultural life in the Theresienstadt ghetto.

He was born on 6 December 1919 in Přerov, in the Czech region of Moravia. His musical talent was obvious from an early age. He began his musical education under the instruction of Růžena Kurzova, and later participated in the master classes conducted by Vilém Kurz in Prague. He went on to study at the conservatory, in the piano class of Alois Hába. He was also a student of philosophy and musicology at the Charles University. When all universities in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia were closed, he continued to take private lessons.

As Jewish artists were banned from performing in public, Gideon continued his career using pseudonyms. In 1940, he received a scholarship from the Royal Academy of Music in London, but he was unable to take advantage of this opportunity because of the anti-Jewish laws. One of his works is Divertimento, an octet for wind instruments, an expressive piece which reflects the political atmosphere of the times and its author’s artistic inspirations.

He was deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto in December 1941 where, shortly after the arrival, he began to give concerts with other musicians, including Pavel Haas and Viktor Ullmann. He played in a piano trio and quartet and performed numerous times as a solo artist. He continued to compose music in the ghettao, creating pieces for a string quartet and a string trio, as well as piano sonatas. He also found time to teach orphans in the ghetto. In October 1944, he was transported to the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp and, later, to the Fürstengrube subcamp where he died in 1945.


Trio for Violin, Viola and Cello

Violin: Marcin Markowicz
Viola: Monika Młynarczyk
Cello: Jan Skopowski

Film: Piotr Bartos
Sound: Maciej Marchewka (Tibo Sound)

Recording from a concert at the White Stork Synagogue in Wroclaw, 9 November 2016.

Madrigal

Written in Theresienstadt in 1942.
Scans of the score were gifted to the exhibition by Terezin Memorial.

 

  

Composition for piano and a voice no. 2 (score)

Written in 1934, Prague to the lyrics of Otokar Březina.
Scans of the score were gifted to the exhibition by Terezin Memorial.

Photo of Gideon Klein, Louis Weinbaum, Heini Tausig, Fredy Mark, Karel Fröhlich
JMP Photo Archive, Neg. No. 081.570

The owner and copyright holder of the visual material is the Jewish Museum in Prague.

Gideon Klein was a pianist, composer, and educator. He received a scholarship from the Royal Academy of Music in London, but anti-Jewish regulations prevented him from making the trip. He organised the cultural life in the Theresienstadt ghetto.

He was born on 6 December 1919 in Přerov, in the Czech region of Moravia. His musical talent was obvious from an early age. He began his musical education under the instruction of Růžena Kurzova, and later participated in the master classes conducted by Vilém Kurz in Prague. He went on to study at the conservatory, in the piano class of Alois Hába. He was also a student of philosophy and musicology at the Charles University. When all universities in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia were closed, he continued to take private lessons.

As Jewish artists were banned from performing in public, Gideon continued his career using pseudonyms. In 1940, he received a scholarship from the Royal Academy of Music in London, but he was unable to take advantage of this opportunity because of the anti-Jewish laws. One of his works is Divertimento, an octet for wind instruments, an expressive piece which reflects the political atmosphere of the times and its author’s artistic inspirations.

He was deported to the Theresienstadt ghetto in December 1941 where, shortly after the arrival, he began to give concerts with other musicians, including Pavel Haas and Viktor Ullmann. He played in a piano trio and quartet and performed numerous times as a solo artist. He continued to compose music in the ghettao, creating pieces for a string quartet and a string trio, as well as piano sonatas. He also found time to teach orphans in the ghetto. In October 1944, he was transported to the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp and, later, to the Fürstengrube subcamp where he died in 1945.

6 XII 1919, Přerov (Moravia) — 27 I 1945, KL Fürstengrube

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