18 VIII 1885, Warsaw — 6 VIII 1942, Warsaw Ghetto

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Biography

Roman Kramsztyk was a neoclassical painter whose works were exhibited all over the world during his lifetime. His later works bear witness to the tragedy of the Holocaust.

He was born in Warsaw on 18 August 1885 to an assimilated Jewish family. He was baptised, studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow under Józef Mehoffer, and later also at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. In 1910-1914, he stayed in Paris, where he joined the Society of Polish Artists and the Polish Artistic and Literary Society. His paintings were displayed in international exhibition, including the International Exposition of Art and Technology in Modern Life of 1937, and at the New York’s World’s Fair, in 1939.

In 1922, he settled permanently in Paris, visiting Poland only for the holidays. In the same year, he co-founded the Association of Polish Artists “RYTM” (‚Rhythm‘) which promoted a classicism-inspired art movement. Cezanne’s aesthetics and French post-impressionism had a significant influence on his work. His body of work includes figurative compositions, landscapes, still lives, nudes, and highly praised portraits of members of the Polish intellectual and artistic elite.

When World War II broke out, Roman was spending his holidays in Poland. Although he had severed his ties to Judaism he was born into a Jewish family and therefore had to move to the Warsaw ghetto along with the city’s Jewish population. He died in the first days of the ghetto’s liquidation, shot in the street on 6 August 1942.

Roman Kramsztyk’s artworks are available in public domain.

Roman Kramsztyk was a neoclassical painter whose works were exhibited all over the world during his lifetime. His later works bear witness to the tragedy of the Holocaust.

He was born in Warsaw on 18 August 1885 to an assimilated Jewish family. He was baptised, studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow under Józef Mehoffer, and later also at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. In 1910-1914, he stayed in Paris, where he joined the Society of Polish Artists and the Polish Artistic and Literary Society. His paintings were displayed in international exhibition, including the International Exposition of Art and Technology in Modern Life of 1937, and at the New York’s World’s Fair, in 1939.

In 1922, he settled permanently in Paris, visiting Poland only for the holidays. In the same year, he co-founded the Association of Polish Artists “RYTM” (‚Rhythm‘) which promoted a classicism-inspired art movement. Cezanne’s aesthetics and French post-impressionism had a significant influence on his work. His body of work includes figurative compositions, landscapes, still lives, nudes, and highly praised portraits of members of the Polish intellectual and artistic elite.

When World War II broke out, Roman was spending his holidays in Poland. Although he had severed his ties to Judaism he was born into a Jewish family and therefore had to move to the Warsaw ghetto along with the city’s Jewish population. He died in the first days of the ghetto’s liquidation, shot in the street on 6 August 1942.

18 VIII 1885, Warsaw — 6 VIII 1942, Warsaw Ghetto

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