25 V 1892, Koźle (Silesia) — 16 XII 1938, Wrocław (after his release from KL Buchenwald)

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Biography

Heinrich Tischler was a painter, architect and interior designer. His works drew from everyday lives of Worcław’s residents, often reflecting them in a re-framed and enhanced manner.

He was born in Koźle but spent his childhood in Wrocław (the former Breslau). He attended architecture and painting classes at the National Academy of Arts and Crafts in Wrocław. In 1914, he had to give up his studies when he was drafted into the army. He was in active service during World War I and his early expressionist works reflect his war-time experiences. After the war, he resumed his studies under the supervision of Hans Poelzig, Fryderyk Pautsch, and Otto Müller.

In 1925, he opened an art school in Wrocław with Isidor Ascheim, another painter and graphic artist. He also ran his own studio, creating both expressionist and realistic works, often drawing from the everyday life around him to painting portraits, genre scenes and landscapes. He was also a successful architect and interior designer. He was responsible for the look of the interiors of the Rudolf Petersdorff department store (the Kameleon department store which stands in Wrocław to this day). In 1929, he took part in the WuWa exhibition where a model housing estate demonstrated how living spaces and workplaces can be transformed thanks to modern and functional technical solutions. The WuWa abbreviation came from the German phrase “Wohnung und Werkraum” which stand for living and working spaces.

Like all artists of Jewish origin, Heinrich was forbidden from continuing his work once the Nazis came to power. After the Kristallnacht, he was arrested and imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp. He was brutally interrogated many times while in the camp. Upon his release he returned to Wrocław where he died of injuries and exhaustion on 16 December 1938. After his death, some of his paintings were saved by his wife. Several of them can be found in the collections of the Silesian Museum in Görlitz and the City Museum of Wrocław.

Heinrich Tischler was a painter, architect and interior designer. His works drew from everyday lives of Worcław’s residents, often reflecting them in a re-framed and enhanced manner.

He was born in Koźle but spent his childhood in Wrocław (the former Breslau). He attended architecture and painting classes at the National Academy of Arts and Crafts in Wrocław. In 1914, he had to give up his studies when he was drafted into the army. He was in active service during World War I and his early expressionist works reflect his war-time experiences. After the war, he resumed his studies under the supervision of Hans Poelzig, Fryderyk Pautsch, and Otto Müller.

In 1925, he opened an art school in Wrocław with Isidor Ascheim, another painter and graphic artist. He also ran his own studio, creating both expressionist and realistic works, often drawing from the everyday life around him to painting portraits, genre scenes and landscapes. He was also a successful architect and interior designer. He was responsible for the look of the interiors of the Rudolf Petersdorff department store (the Kameleon department store which stands in Wrocław to this day). In 1929, he took part in the WuWa exhibition where a model housing estate demonstrated how living spaces and workplaces can be transformed thanks to modern and functional technical solutions. The WuWa abbreviation came from the German phrase “Wohnung und Werkraum” which stand for living and working spaces.

Like all artists of Jewish origin, Heinrich was forbidden from continuing his work once the Nazis came to power. After the Kristallnacht, he was arrested and imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp. He was brutally interrogated many times while in the camp. Upon his release he returned to Wrocław where he died of injuries and exhaustion on 16 December 1938. After his death, some of his paintings were saved by his wife. Several of them can be found in the collections of the Silesian Museum in Görlitz and the City Museum of Wrocław.

The artworks and Heinrich Tischler’s portrait belong to the Schesisches Museum zu Görlitz.
(© Foto: Schlesisches Museum zu Görlitz)