3 July 1885, Maksimovichi (a village in Belarus)
– 1941, the Minsk Ghetto

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Biography

Sara Kagan was a Yiddish poet and writer. In the 1930s, she was probably the only female member of the Jewish section of the Writers’ Union of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (BSSR). She was particularly interested in writing about the countryside, nature, and contemporary social issues.

 

She was born in the village of Maksimovichi, located on the territory of today’s Belarus. Her father worked in forestry, her mother was a housewife, and the couple had ten kids. Sara inherited her love for literature from her mother. As an adult, she worked as a head of the town library in Babruysk. From time to time, she participated in meetings for aspiring writers held in Minsk. In 1935, Sara moved with her family to Minsk, following the suggestion of the municipal party organisation of the Jewish section of the Writers’ Union of the BSSR, of which she was probably the only female member. After the move, she began evening studies at the Faculty of Philology of the Belarusian Pedagogical Institute. She continued to work and took care of the house, rising three sons. In 1930s, one of her children died of pneumonia. She was badly affected by this loss.

Sara Kagan wrote in Yiddish. She belonged to the generation of Jewish writers who took their first steps in the world of literature in the post-revolutionary years. She made her debut in 1929, and, in the pre-war decade, published a collection of short stories titled The First Prize and three collections of poems: On the Way, My Homeland and Our People. Before the war broke out, she also published a novel titled Violinist. Zmitrok Biadula translated some of her works into Belarusian and a collection of her short stories in this language was published in 1940. She worked in the editorial office of Shtern, a Yiddish-language literary magazine. In this publication, she often wrote about current affairs, paying particular attention to the issues related to the countryside, which remained close to her heart, especially the natural landscapes of Belarus and peasant heroes.

When the German army captured Minsk in 1941, Sara and her family were transferred to the ghetto. She died there, together with her husband and younger son. Her older son was killed during the fighting at the front. None of her closest relatives survived the war.

The copyright owner of Sara Kagan’s portrait is Yad Vashem.
Sara Kagan, Yad Vashem, Hall of Names photos, Archival Signature: 15000/14118413

Sara Kagan was a Yiddish poet and writer. In the 1930s, she was probably the only female member of the Jewish section of the Writers’ Union of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (BSSR). She was particularly interested in writing about the countryside, nature, and contemporary social issues.

She was born in the village of Maksimovichi, located on the territory of today’s Belarus. Her father worked in forestry, her mother was a housewife, and the couple had ten kids. Sara inherited her love for literature from her mother. As an adult, she worked as a head of the town library in Babruysk. From time to time, she participated in meetings for aspiring writers held in Minsk. In 1935, Sara moved with her family to Minsk, following the suggestion of the municipal party organisation of the Jewish section of the Writers’ Union of the BSSR, of which she was probably the only female member. After the move, she began evening studies at the Faculty of Philology of the Belarusian Pedagogical Institute. She continued to work and took care of the house, rising three sons. In 1930s, one of her children died of pneumonia. She was badly affected by this loss.

Sara Kagan wrote in Yiddish. She belonged to the generation of Jewish writers who took their first steps in the world of literature in the post-revolutionary years. She made her debut in 1929, and, in the pre-war decade, published a collection of short stories titled The First Prize and three collections of poems: On the Way, My Homeland and Our People. Before the war broke out, she also published a novel titled Violinist. Zmitrok Biadula translated some of her works into Belarusian and a collection of her short stories in this language was published in 1940. She worked in the editorial office of Shtern, a Yiddish-language literary magazine. In this publication, she often wrote about current affairs, paying particular attention to the issues related to the countryside, which remained close to her heart, especially the natural landscapes of Belarus and peasant heroes.

When the German army captured Minsk in 1941, Sara and her family were transferred to the ghetto. She died there, together with her husband and younger son. Her older son was killed during the fighting at the front. None of her closest relatives survived the war.

3 July 1885, Maksimovichi (a village in Belarus)
– 1941, the Minsk Ghetto

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PL  |  DE  |  ENG  | NO |  UKR